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FAA orders emergency jet engine inspections after United States plane failure

22 April 2018

Once the inspections are completed, CFM recommended to repeat the process every 3,000 cycles - about two years in airline service - but the FAA did not require such a measure.

As reported earlier this month, a woman died while travelling on a Boeing 737 when a engine fan blade broke loose and caused an explosion at 30,000 feet.

Jennifer Riordan had two children.

The FAA said: "Fan blade failure due to cracking could result in an engine in-flight shutdown, uncontained release of debris and possible airplane decompression".

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Engines in 681 aircraft will be checked worldwide.

CFM is jointly owned by General Electric and France's Safran.

A Southwest Airlines plane flying from NY to Dallas had to make an emergency landing Tuesday morning in Philadelphia after one of its engines was damaged, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

A similar accident on a Southwest flight in August 2016 forced a plane, equipped with the same engine, to make an emergency landing.

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The agency issued the emergency directive after the maker of the engine, CFM International, called for the inspection of fan blades on CFM56-7B engines.

Following an engine malfunction that sent parts flying through a plane window, killing a passenger this week, many Boeing Co (NYSE:BA) planes with similar engines will be inspected in order to prevent another such tragedy.

The U.S and European airline regulators ordered for inspection of almost 700 aircraft engines which are similar to the one involved in fatal southwest airlines engine blowout so as to ensure no risks of a similar mishap is present.

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FAA orders emergency jet engine inspections after United States plane failure